National Nutrition Month: Consult a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN)

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March is National Nutrition Month©.  Join the East Texas Food Bank and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in celebration by focusing on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

This week, the focus is on consulting a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist.  Here are some tips to help guide you:

  • Ask your doctor for a referral to visit an RDN – Many registered dietitian nutritionists work in the treatment and prevention of disease by providing medical nutrition therapy. The RDN often acts as part of a medical team, in various practice settings, such as hospitals, physician offices, private practice and other health care facilities.  More information
  • Receive personalized nutrition advice to meet goals – An RDN can help you create measurable, action-oriented and time-bound goals.   More information
  • Meet with RDNs in settings throughout the community – A registered dietitian nutritionist is a food and nutrition expert who has met academic and professional requirements  More information
  • Find an RDN who is specialized to serve your unique needs – Between what you hear on TV and read in the news, eating right can seem like a real challenge. But it doesn’t have to be. A registered dietitian, or RD, or registered dietitian nutritionist, or RDN, will partner with you to develop a safe and realistic eating plan that you can stick with for the long haul. To guide and motivate you, an RD or RDN will use creative and out-of-the-box strategies to help with meal planning, grocery shopping and mindful eating.  More information
  • Thrive through the transformative power of food and nutrition – Eating right is not a one-size-fits-all endeavor. A healthy plate can include foods from all corners of the globe. In fact, the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans says, “Healthy eating patterns are adaptable … Any eating pattern can be tailored to the individual’s socio-cultural and personal preferences.” More information

Information provided by eatright.org

Cooking Matters class help ETFB empower families to make healthier choices

The East Texas Food Bank isn’t just helping feed people, they’re also helping families change the way they think about eating.

Nutrition Education Manager Kinsey Jeffers teaches a 6-week course called Cooking Matters, that challenges participants to rethink the way they shop, cook and feed their families.

“The first four weeks we talk about nutrition education and kitchen and food safety,” Jeffers said. “The fifth week we go on a grocery store tour, and the sixth week is a potluck and we play a nutrition (trivia) game.”
(Read more from Tyler Paper)

National Nutrition Month: Learn skills to create tasty meals

NNM Create Tasty Meals

March is National Nutrition Month©.  Join the East Texas Food Bank and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in celebration by focusing on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

This week, the focus is on learning skills to create tasty meals.  Here are some tips to help guide you:

  • Keep healthy ingredients on hand – When it comes to buying fruits and vegetables, many factors play a role in which types consumers choose, including nutritional value. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says all fruits and vegetables — fresh, frozen, canned or dried — are good-for-you foods that can be enjoyed at any time.  More information
  • Practice proper home food safety – Handling foods safely is much more than throwing away expired milk or washing your fruits and vegetables. While these actions are important, there are several more common food safety mistakes that can result in major consequences.   More information
  • Share meals together as a family when possible – Cooking at home can be healthy, rewarding and cost-effective. And, according to research, taste tops nutrition as the main reason why Americans buy one food over another. The foods you enjoy are likely the ones you eat the most, so make taste a kitchen priority when preparing nutritious, satisfying meals.  More information
  • Reduce food waste – Food waste — when edible items go uneaten, including “plate waste” in retail establishments such as restaurants and cafeterias — is an increasingly important issue in food security. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service, billions of pounds of food goes to waste each year.  More information
  • Try new flavors and foods – Eating right is not a one-size-fits-all endeavor. A healthy plate can include foods from all corners of the globe. In fact, the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans says, “Healthy eating patterns are adaptable … Any eating pattern can be tailored to the individual’s socio-cultural and personal preferences.” More information

Information provided by eatright.org

National Nutrition Month: Plan your meals each week

National Nutrition Month Week 2

March is National Nutrition Month©.  Join the East Texas Food Bank and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in celebration by focusing on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

This week, the focus is on planning your meals each week.  Here are some tips to help guide you:

  • Make a menu – Think about your approach to meal planning.  Want to make a weekly or monthly plan?  Prepare meals ahead of time, just before or both?  Pick a day to cook meals for the week or a month that you can store in the freezer?  More information
  • Use a grocery list to shop for healthful food – Along with planning menus, make a list of items you need most.  Find and use coupons, shop store brands, read food labels and shop seasonally   More information
  • Be menu savvy when dining out – Restaurant food is meant to look, smell and taste great, and that means nutrition can sometimes fall by the wayside when menus feature main dishes drenched in butter or rich sauces, salads with creamy dressings, and few whole grains, fruits and vegetables.  More information
  • Choose healthful recipes to make during the week – Planning your meals each week involves choosing healthful recipes.  Ensure you’re properly following each step by brushing up on culinary lingo.  More information
  • Enjoy healthful eating at school, work or traveling – Whether you pack a lunch for your child or for yourself, using proper food safety measures is a vital part of the process. More information
    When you are on the go, healthful eating habits don’t have to go out the winder.  Plan healthful eating while traveling.  More information

Information provided by eatright.org

National Nutrition Month: Eat a variety of nutritious foods

National Nutrition Month Week 1

March is National Nutrition Month©.  Join the East Texas Food Bank and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in celebration by focusing on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

This week, the focus is on eating a variety of nutritious foods every day.  Here are some tips to help guide you:

  • Include healthful foods from all food groups – Eating healthy doesn’t have to be complicated.  You should enjoy the food you eat. In choosing nutrient-rich foods, you’ll notice they are familiar, easy to find and represent the five basic food groups. Achieving balance and building a healthier eating pattern can be simple and low-stress.  More information
  • Hydrate healthfully – About 60 percent of your body is made of water. It plays a role in keeping all of your body systems working well. Staying well hydrated can help reduce your risk of developing kidney stones, urinary tract infections and constipation.  More information
  • Learn how to read nutrition facts panels – Look at serving size, total calories, Percent Daily Value and nutrition terms.  Choose low in saturated fat, added sugars and sodium.  Be sure to get enough vitamins, minerals and fiber.  More information
  • Practice portion control – A serving is a specific amount of food or drink. It is defined by a common measurement, such as cups, ounces or tablespoons.  A portion is the amount of food that happens to end up on the plate. Think of portion size as the actual amount of food kids choose to eat at breakfast, lunch, dinner or as a snack. Portions may be larger or smaller than the recommended serving sizes.  More information
  • Take time to enjoy your food – Kids in families who eat together are more confident, have better vocabularies and higher test scores. It can be tricky to schedule regular meals together, but the strong bond your family will share is worth the effort.  More information

Information provided by eatright.org